A Not So Current Trend

The Great and the Simple

(c) National Trust, Blickling Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation (c) National Trust, Blickling Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Selfie

Oh social media. So much of it lambasted for cultural demise, yet it’s just a current way to do what people have done for centuries, which is self-fashion. As the European monarchs of old had self portraits painted in very particular ways of presenting themselves and their power, as autobiographers have carefully edited their lives to print and sell to the masses, so Facebook and Instagram serve as the common man’s modern equivalent.

Because we have easy access to present ourselves, the ability to literally create a persona of whoever we want to be is possible (though the reality of ourselves will always be apparent to those who actually interact with us). Additionally, we have easy access to…everyone else. So to create ourselves online, we have a virtual “closet” of personalities to try on and present to the world. We…

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Old timey skills

Mainz Daily Photo

Tools of the trade for a slate maker

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The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows by Rudyard Kipling (Little Black Classics No. 24)

Books Bird

24

To celebrate their 80th anniversary, Penguin released 80 ‘Little Black Classics’. Number 24 is a collection of short stories by Rudyard Kipling taken from Plain Tales from the Hills, which was published in 1980.

The tales set in imperial India are all told through the eyes of an omniscient narrator. The stories full of myth, secrets, mystery and magic make unique and interesting reading, like nothing I’ve read before.

Kipling’s tales whilst full of fantasy and magic, do still successfully portray a vivid image of India and its cultures.

These Little Black Classics are a great way to read something by an author you’ve never read before as they offer a quick read of some of their work. If like me you’ve never read any Kipling, this book could be your place to start.

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Amazon UK

Amazon US

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ArtsBeat: 10 Murals in Brooklyn to Spruce Up Construction Site

Ian Bagley

During a street fair on Aug. 15, 10 murals will be painted on a large wall on Dean Street in Prospect Heights.


from NYT > Arts http://ift.tt/1I5kWZ3

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Young Adult Literature Convention (YALC) Roundup!

Paper Neverland

Last weekend, I joined the crowd of teenagers, publicists, Disney Princesses and various super heroes that swarmed towards Olympia, London. Held alongside the London Film and Comic Convention, the second annual Young Adult Literature Convention promised to be bigger and better than last year’s, with a floor of it’s own and a jaw dropping line up.
The centre of the room was given to the main stage, where throughout the day a host of authors would be discussing key debates in YA literature, sharing their favourite books, and taking questions from the audience.

Unfortunately, I could only attend on the Sunday and missed some great panels from previous days including ‘Being a Girl: Feminism and YA Today’ and Judy Bloom in conversation with Patrick Ness. Throughout the talks on Sunday, it became abundantly clear what an impact her writing has had on YA authors today, many of whom grew up reading…

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CURRENTLY READING more than one book and I am not cut out for this life

Commas and Ampersands

I’m loving All the Light We Cannot See but it’s a massive book to take on after a reading slump. I decided to try being one of those people who can read more than one book at a time and I regret it. So now I’m going to finish Suddenly Calling, then finish All the Light We Cannot See, and see how I like Shadows by Paula Weston since she’s doing a book signing at a nearby shopping centre on the 1st of August.

This may or may not be easier now that all the reality renovation shows have finished airing. I really am a sucker for them.

(Also, we got a NutriBullet and it’s super easy to use and I’m going to make banana smoothies for the rest of my life.)

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Big Books

A Walk Into The Wild

So I’m currently reading A Game of Thrones, and it got me thinking, due to its sheer size. How do we feel about big books? I’m talking books 600/700+ plus? I absolutely love A Game of Thrones, it’s brilliant, but due to being a work and having reading to do for uni I don’t feel like I’m reading it quick enough and I’m anxious to start reading some other smaller novels.

Does anyone else ever feel like, whilst they’re enjoying a good long book, that they’re missing out on reading two or three books in the time it takes to read that one?

I’m just babbling and thinking aloud but I am curious to see what others think?

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The hypocrite

newauthoronline

You choke on your cornflakes over stories of vicars and hoares,

And when the death sentence is imposed you give loud applause.

When they call for moral regeneration your first in the queue,

Oh my friend what if they knew what you do.

Behind closed doors the lamplight is low,

To the girl, barely legal, you are “Mr So and So”.

When the deed’s done homewards you go,

To the wife, and the kids – fine, upstanding Mr So and So.

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#4 Random Book Tag

Girl. Computer. World.

Saw this on Lauren Reads YA, and I’ve chosen a few questions:

1. What is your favourite book?

I can’t really choose one book, because they’re all my babies. But if I had to pick one that I’d read over and over again, it would be Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. If you haven’t read it before, go read it. Please.

2. Who is your favourite author?

I have a few favourite authors if I am forced to pick. They would be Rainbow Rowell, Cassandra Clare, and Veronica Roth. Rainbow Rowell for her awesome stories, Cassandra Clare for her epic Mortal Instruments series (and many more to come), and finally Veronica Roth because she is awesome and I love Divergent. Also, if I had to choose a recent debut, I would totally say Sabaa Tahir, because An Ember in the Ashes? FRIGGIN LOVE IT.

3…

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My love letter to Orwell’s love letter to language – 1984

Banana Chips and Tiramisu

Plot is important, grammatical accuracy is important, providing a metaphor for life on this planet is important. Above all those things, to me what makes a genuinely good book great is its ability to inspire emotions. The emotion a piece of literature evokes does not necessarily have to be sadness or existentialism, it can be happiness or carpe diem. The Lowlands by Jhumpa Lahiri, for example, was a fascinating book that was oh so well written. Her command on the English language is commendable to say the least but what it failed to do, at least in my view, was inspire some sort of empathy in the reader. I didn’t connect with a single character in the book as they went through tumultuous lives. What lies ahead from this point is wrought with spoilers, I must warn you. For I cannot express my absolute love for this book without telling…

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